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Contraception

Male Condom

Combined Pill

Contraceptive patch

Natural family planning

Intrauterine system (Mirena/Jaydess - IUS)

Contraceptive injection

Female Condom

Progesterone only pill

Vaginal ring

Diaphragm with spermicide

Copper coil (IUD

Implant

* LARC - Long acting methods - you dont have to remember to take or use them each time you have sex.

Male Condom Female condom Combined pill Progesterone only pill Contraceptive patch Vaginal ring Natural family planning Diaphragm with spermicide Intrauterine system (Mirena - IUS) Copper coil (IUD) Contraceptive injection Implant
What is it?? Thin latex (rubber) or polyurethane that is put over the erect penis. Soft polyurethane (plastic) that lines the vagina and the area just outside. A tablet releasing two hormones, oestrogen and a progestagen. Tablet releasing the hormone Progesterone slowly into the body. A small patch stuck on the skin containing 2 hormones progesterone and oestrogen. It is a small, flexible plastic ring placed in the vagina and changed each month. It releases oestrogen and progestogen. Natural method used to indicate when you are most fertile (this is when you have the greatest chance of getting pregnant). A flexible latex (soft rubber) or silicone cap that covers the cervix (neck of the womb) used with spermicide. A small plastic device inserted into the womb which slowly releases the hormone Progesterone. There are two types of IUS, one called the Mirena and one called the Jaydess A small plastic and copper device put into the womb. Injection containing 1 hormone: Progestogen. You can either have the Depo-Provera that a nurse of doctor can give you or the Sayana Press which is an injection you give yourself A small flexible rod inserted under the skin of the upper arm; releases the hormone: Progestogen.
Does it protect against STIs? Yes. Yes. No. No. No. No. No. They may protect against some STIs but not all. No. No. No. No.
What are the advantages? No serious side effects.
Can be used by women who cannot use Oestrogen.
Can be used by women of any age including those who smoke and are over 35.
When you stop using it your normal level of fertility will return.
Can use it if you are breast feeding.
You don't have to think about contraception everyday.
It can reduce bleeding, period pain and pre-menstrual symptoms.
Protects against cancer of the ovary, womb and bowel.
When you stop using it your fertility will return to normal.
Suitable for healthy non-smokers up to the menopause.
Not affected by diarrhoea or vomiting.
Once inserted you do not have to think about contraception for the rest of the month.
It is easy to insert and remove.
It is not affected if you vomit or have diarrhoea.
Can make your periods lighter and less painful.
May protect against cancer of the ovary, colon and uterus.
When you stop using it your fertility will return to normal.
Suitable for healthy non-smokers up to the menopause.
No side-effects.
No hormones are used.
No tablets/devices are needed.
Can also be used to plan a pregnancy.
It is acceptable by all faiths and cultures.
In can be put in anytime before sex.
No major side effects.
The Mirena lasts for 5 years and the Jaydess lasts for 3 years, but either can be taken out sooner.
Periods usually become lighter, shorter and less painful or may stop.
You don't have to think about your contraception once it has been inserted.
When the IUS is removed your fetility will return to normal.
You can use it if you are breast feeding.
Lasts for 5-10 years depending on type but can be taken out sooner.
It contains no hormones.
It works as soon as it is put in.
You don't have to think about contraception while it is in place.
When the IUD is removed your fertility will return to normal.
Lasts for 12 weeks.
You don't have to think about it, Contraception for as long as the injection lasts.
You can use it if you are breastfeeding.
Lasts for 3 years but can be taken out sooner.
You don't have to think about contraception whilst the implant is in place.
When the implant is removed your fertility will return to normal
What are the disadvantages? It needs to be taken at the same time each day - it is not effective if taken more than three hours late (more than 12 hours for cerazette)
Your periods may stop or become irregular, light or more frequent.
Temporary minor side-effects such as spotty skin, breast tenderness, weight gain, headaches.
May be less effective in women who weigh over 70kg.
A small increased risk of ectopic pregnancy if it fails.
Not suitable for very overweight women or smokers over 35 years.
It may be seen.
There may be temporary minor side-effects such as headaches, mood swings, mild sickness and breast tenderness.
In the first few months, you can get a bit of spotting when inbetween periods.
It can increase your blood pressure.
Very low risk but serious side-effects may include blood clots.
Not suitable for very overweight women or smokers over the age of 35 years.
Very low risk but serious side effect of blood clot.
Can be temporary side effects including increased vaginal discharge and vaginal infections, headaches, mood swings, mild sickness and breast tenderness.
Breakthrough bleeding and spotting may occur in the first few months.
You have to keep daily records.
You need to avoid sex during 'fertile' times, or use a condom.
Illness, lifestyle, stress or travel might affect your fertility indicators.
It can take time to learn how to use correctly.
It must be inserted before the penis touches the woman's genital area.
Putting it in may interrupt foreplay.
The woman must know beforehand that she is planning to have sex.
Extra spermicide is needed if you have sex again.
Cystitis can be a problem for some users.
Irregular bleeding or spotting is common in the first 6 months.
Some women report temporary spotty skin, breast tenderness and headaches.
In the first 3 weeks there is a very small chance of getting an infection. (this is minimised by having an STI screen beforehand)
Your periods might change so they might become heavier or more painful.
In the first 3 weeks there is a small chance of getting an infection. (this is minimised by havind an STI screen beforehand)
There is a small risk on an ectopic pregnancy if the IUD fails.
Your periods may usually become lighter and eventually stop altogether, some women have spotting.
After you stop using the injection it may take a while for your periods and fertility to return to normal.
Some women gain weight.
Some women report mood changes, spotty skin, breast tenderness, headaches.
The injection cannot be removed from the body so any side effects may continue for some time.
For the first 3-6 months you may get irregular periods or spotting - this usually settles.
Some women report mood changes, spotty skin, breast tenderness.
How does it work? Prevents sperm entering the vagina. Prevents sperm entering the vagina. Prevents eggs being released by the ovaries (ovulation). Makes mucus around the cervix (neck of the womb) thick so sperm find it difficult to get in. Makes the lining of the womb thin which will make it difficult for a fertilised egg to become embedded. Makes fluid around the cervix (neck of the womb) thick so sperm find it difficult to get in. Makes fluid around the cervix (neck of the womb) thick so sperm find it difficult to get in. May prevent eggs being released by the ovaries (ovulation). Prevents eggs being released by the ovaries (ovulation)..
Makes fluid around the cervix (neck of the womb) thick so sperm find it difficult to get in..
Makes the lining of the womb thin so if the egg comes along, it is difficult for it to become embedded.
Prevents eggs being released by the ovaries (ovulation).
Makes fluid around the cervix (neck of the womb) thick so sperm find it difficult to get in.
Makes the lining of the womb thin so a fertilised egg finds I difficult to become embedded.
Markers are used to tell you when you are fertile/ infertile which shows when you are at the lowest risk of pregnancy. Prevents sperm entering the womb (uterus). Makes fluid around the cervix (neck of the womb) thick so sperm finds it difficult to get in.
Makes the lining of the womb thin which will make it difficult for a fertilised egg to become embedded.
May prevent eggs being released by the ovaries (ovulation).
It stops the sperm from reaching the egg. Makes the lining of the womb unfavourable which will make it difficult for the fertilised egg to become embedded. It does not cause an abortion Makes mucus around the cervix (neck of the womb) thick so sperm finds it difficult to get in.
Makes the lining of the womb thin which will make it difficult for a fertilised egg to become embedded.
May prevent eggs being released by the ovaries (ovulation).
Prevents eggs being released by the ovaries (ovulation).
Makes mucus around the cervix (neck of the womb) thick so sperm finds it difficult to get in.
Makes the lining of the womb thin, which will make it difficult for a fertilised egg to become embedded.
How do I use it? See condom tips See condom tips Start the pack within the first 5 days of your period starting. The day you start the packet will be the same day of the week that you start future packets. This protects you against pregnancy immediately. If you don't start your pill within the first 5 days of your period, you need to use extra protection (condoms) for 7 days. Take the tablet at the same time every day. You will finish all the pills in the pack. If you are taking a 21 day pack, take a 7 day break. During this week you should have a bleed. Start your pill on the 8th day (which is the same day of the week as you took your first pill). Start the pack within the first five days of your period. This covers you against pregnancy immediately. Take the tablet at the same time every day. You will finish all the pills in the pack. You then start a new pack the next day so there are no breaks between packs. This means that you will be taking pills during your period. If you are 3 hours late in taking your pill, it will count as a missed pill. See Below If you don't start the first pack on the first day of your period, you need to use extra protection for 2 days. If you apply the patch to your skin within the first 5 days of your period starting, you will be protected from pregnancy immediately. If you don't start using the patch within the first 5 days of your period, you need to use extra protection (condoms) or abstain for 7 days.
Change the patch once a week for 3 weeks then have a patch-free break for a week. During this break you should have a bleed. Reapply a new patch after the 7 day break.
Your doctor or nurse will teach you how to insert and remove the vaginal ring. The ring cannot get lost and precise positioning is not necessary. The ring is inserted into the vagina and left in place for 3 weeks and then removed for one week. During the ring free week you will have a light bleed. Insert a new ring after 7 days this will be the same day of the week that you took the previous one out. You should do this even if you are still bleeding.
When starting using it for the first time, the ring is best inserted on the first day of your period as you will be protected against pregnancy immediately. If you start the ring on day 2-5 you will need to use additional contraception such as condoms for the first 7 days.
Daily recording of body temperature, cervical secretions and length of cycle. You will need to go to a clinic to be fitted for the correct size.
You have to put spermicide on the diaphragm and then squeeze it into your vagina to cover the cervix.
You need to leave it in for at least 6 hours after you have sex.
If you have sex more than once, you need extra spermicide.
A trained doctor or nurse will fit the IUS inside your womb.
It takes 15-20mins to fit.
You may get period type pains for a few hours after fitting.
A trained doctor or nurse will fit the IUD inside your womb.
It takes 15-20mins to fit.
You may get period pains for a few hours after fitting.
The Depo-Provera is administered by a doctor or nurse who will give you an injection into the muscle of your bottom
The Sayana Press is the contraceptive injection you can inject yourself in the skin of the abdomen or thigh
A doctor or nurse will insert the implant into your upper arm underneath the skin (they numb the skin first with a anaesthetic).
It is the length of a hairpin.
No stiches are needed.
You can feel the implant but you might not see it under the skin.
Can anyone use it? Yes Any man can use this. Use polyurethane condoms if allergic to latex. Yes, Any women can use this. You cannot use it if you are breast feeding.
Women with severe migraines or migraines with aura cannot use it.
Women who have had a thrombosis in any vein or artery, or have a heart abnormality, or have high blood pressure, or have active liver or gall bladder disease cannot use it.
If you are very overweight or continue smoking after you are 35 you cannot use it.
Women with breast cancer or breast cancer in the last 5 yrs cannot use it.
You can use it if you are breast feeding.
Some people with migraines cannot use it.
If you have any medical problems / take any medications you need to discuss with the doctor whether you can use it.
You cannot use it if you are breast feeding.
Women with severe migraines or migraines with aura cannot use it.
Women who have had a thrombosis in any vein or artery, or have a heart abnormality, or have high blood pressure, or have active liver or gall bladder disease cannot use it.
Women with breast cancer or breast cancer in the last 5 yrs cannot use it.
If you are very overweight or continue smoking after you are 35 you cannot use it.
If you have any medical problems / take any medications you need to discuss with the doctor whether you can use it.
You cannot use it if you are breast feeding.
Women with severe migraines or migraines with aura cannot use it.
Women who have had a thrombosis (blood clot) in any vein or artery, or have a heart abnormality, or have high blood pressure, or have active liver disease or gall bladder disease cannot use it.
Women who are very overweight or continue smoking over 35 years cannot use it.
Women with breast cancer or breast cancer in the last 5years cannot use it.
Yes most women can use this method. However those who have irregular periods, recently had a baby or are coming up to the menopause, should use an alternative form of contraception. Yes, Any women can use this.
You can use it if you are breast feeding.
Some women's pelvic floor muscles may be too weak to hold the diaphragm.
You can use it if you are breast feeding.
You cannot use it if you have an untreated STI.
You cannot use it if you have problems with your womb.
If fitted after 45 it can stay in place until the menopause.
Very helpful for women with very heavy and/or painful periods.
You cannot use it if you have an untreated STI.
You can use it if you are breast feeding.
If fitted at age 40 years or older it can stay in place until the menopause.
You can use it if you are breast feeding.
You cannot use it if you have had certain forms of cancer, a heart attack or stroke, problems with your liver or severe depression.
You can use it if you are breast feeding.
You cannot use it if you have had certain forms of cancer, a heart attack or stroke, or problems with your liver.
Methods suitable for women using antiretroviral therapy? Yes. Yes. No. Use another method of contraception. HAART makes pill less effective. No. Use another method of contraception. HAART makes pill less effective. No. Use another method of contraception. HAART makes pill less effective. No. Use another method of contraception. HAART makes pill less effective. No. Will need to use condoms all the time to prevent HIV transmission. No. Anti spermicidal gels may enhance HIV transmission. Yes. Use condoms as well to prevent HIV transmission. Yes. Use condoms as well to prevent HIV transmission. Yes. Use condoms as well to prevent HIV transmission. Maybe. Discuss with your doctor first. Use condoms as well to prevent HIV transmission.
How well does it work if the instructions are followed carefully? 98% effective.
If 100 couples used it for a year, 2 women would become pregnant.
95% effective.
If 100 couples used it for a year, 5 women would become pregnant.
99% effective.
If 100 women took it for a year, 1 would become pregnant.
99% effective.
If 100 women took it for a year, 1 would become pregnant.
99% effective.
If 100 women took it for a year, 1 would become pregnant.
99% effective.
If 100 women took it for a year, 1 would become pregnant.
Upto 98% effective.
(If 100 couples used it for a year, 2 women would become pregnant).
92-96% effective.
If 100 couples used it for a year, 4-8 women would become pregnant.
99% effective.
If 100 women took it for a year, 1 would become pregnant.
99% effective.
If 100 women took it for a year, 1 would become pregnant.
99% effective.
If 100 women took it for a year, 1 would become pregnant.
99% effective.
If 100 women took it for a year, 1 would become pregnant.
What happens if I forget to use it or use it wrong? You can get pregnant or get an STI. You can get pregnant or get an STI. Missing pills can mean that you are not protected and might get pregnant. Missing one pill is not a problem. If you have missed more than one pill continue to take the pills in the pack (leave out the ones you have missed), use condoms and seek further medical advice, as what you do depends on several factors. You may need emergency contraception. If you are less than 24 hours late, take a pill as soon as you remember, and take the next one at the usual time. You are protected against pregnancy. Missing pills can mean that you are not protected and might get pregnant. If you are more than three hours late Take a pill as soon as you remember. If you have missed more than one pill just take one. Take your next pill at the usual time. This may mean taking two pills in one day. This is not harmful. Take the rest of your pills as usual, but you also need to use an extra method, such as condoms, for the next two days. If you are less than three hours late take a pill as soon as you remember, and take the next one at the usual time. You are protected against pregnancy. Missing a patch by 48 hours can mean that you are not protected and might become pregnant. You must seek advice. If you forget to remove the ring after 3 weeks remove as soon as you remember. If you remember within 7 days then start your 7 day ring free interval when the ring is removed and put in a new ring on the same day of the week as you removed the old one. If you have left the ring in for more than 7 days (i.e. more than a month in total) then remove the old ring and insert a new one immediately, but also use condoms for the next 7 days. If you have had sex in the previous few days before changing the ring and were not using a condom you may need to use emergency contraception - discuss with your doctor or nurse. You can get pregnant. You can get pregnant or get an STI. Whilst you have the IUS in place you cannot get pregnant. You may be at risk of an ectopic pregnancy (pregnancy outside of the womb) if it fails. If you don't have an injection at the appropriate time it can mean that you are not protected and might get pregnant. If you don't replace the implant at the appropriate time it can mean that you are not protected and might get pregnant.
Will it affect any other medication that I am taking? No. Don't use oil based lubricants with latex condoms. No. Some medicines can interact with the pill e.g. some antibiotics, some antiretrovirals, some antiepileptic medication and St. John's Wort. You should tell your doctor or pharmacist which medications you are taking. If you vomit within 2 hours of taking the pill it will not be effective. Take another pill as soon as you feel better. If you miss more than 2 pills you should seek advice and may need emergency contraception. Some medicines can make it less effective. Most common antibiotics do not affect the Progesterone only pill. Not effective if you are vomiting or have severe diarrhoea. You will need to take extra precautions for 2 days. Some medicines can interact with the patch like some antibiotics, some antiretroviral, some antiepileptic medication and St Johns Wort. You should tell your doctor or pharmacist which medications you are taking. Some medicines can interact with the hormones released by the ring and make it less effective e.g. some antibiotics, some antiretroviral medicines, some antiepileptic medication and St John Wort. You should tell your doctor or pharmacist which medications you are taking.
Vaginal treatments for thrush do not affect the ring.
No. No. No. No. No. Some medicines can interact with the implant like anti TB and antiepileptic medication and St. John's Wort.
You should tell the doctor which medications you are taking.
For more information See condom tips See condom tips www.fpa.org.uk
www.brook.org.uk
www.fpa.org.uk
www.brook.org.uk
www.fpa.org.uk
www.brook.org.uk
www.fertilityuk.org
www.fpa.org.uk
www.brook.org.uk
Sayana Press http://www.sayanaanswers.co.uk/